Lauren Turk

Shameless Promotin’. Day 3

Posted on

For the last couple of weeks most artists, including both of us from Team CG, have been participating in the Art Exchange Game. Post 3 pieces everyday, for 5 days and nominate 3-5 (depending on the person who nominated you) other artists to do the same. The rules are muddy but the intent is clear: to give artists the space to promote themselves shamelessly, expand our networks and see what everyone’s up to. The byproduct of this experiment is an undeniable demonstration of talent to proves there’s not short supply here. Anyone with a platform for artwork should feel like a kid in a candy store right now.

Thank you to Kelly Riker for the nomination. Good luck to Amy Babinec, Anni Holm, Angela Bryant, Lauren Turk and Todd Reed. We’re looking forward to seeing what you have to offer.

 

Diana Gabriel

Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 7.55.15 PM

 

Day 3. Piece 1. Plata.

10931393_10155275474325556_8605348672699712410_n

 

Day 3. Piece 2. from the Tropisms series @Arrowhead Room at Waubonsee Community College

10922837_10155275473085556_723558211770886740_n

Day 3. Piece 3. Regular Parameters

10931251_10155275472035556_7422598863331304400_n

Amy Babinec. Day 2

Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 8.01.04 PM

10904510_10203451709069228_7294917637801158756_o

Anni Holm. Day 1

Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 8.04.28 PM

10924648_10153045686882354_8012250707754827815_n

Angela Bryant. Day 1

 Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 8.06.12 PM10915247_10206128662364220_751116974166134292_n

 

Advertisements

Shameless Promotin’. Day 2

Posted on Updated on

For the last couple of weeks most artists, including both of us from Team CG, have been participating in the Art Exchange Game. Post 3 pieces everyday, for 5 days and nominate 3-5 (depending on the person who nominated you) other artists to do the same. The rules are muddy but the intent is clear: to give artists the space to promote themselves shamelessly, expand our networks and see what everyone’s up to. The byproduct of this experiment is an undeniable demonstration of talent to proves there’s not short supply here. Anyone with a platform for artwork should feel like a kid in a candy store right now.

Thank you to Kelly Riker for the nomination. Good luck to Amy Babinec, Anni Holm, Angela Bryant, Lauren Turk and Todd Reed. We’re looking forward to seeing what you have to offer.

Thanks to the Andrea Ferrigno who curated the show at Knox College and Cecilia Vargas who curated the one at Waubonsee. Check out this article from Ally Byerly of The Knox College Student paper about the show and this one about a protest held right in front of the piece.

Diana Gabriel

Screen Shot 2015-01-24 at 2.35.00 PM

Day 2. Piece 1. Blanket @ Knox College

10355410_10155279351650556_6325593968702450623_o

10915677_10155271796505556_3862734220822350645_o

Day 2. Piece 2. Intersecting Triangles @Arrowhead Room at Waubonsee Community College

10933822_10155271799400556_9191236599514600625_n

10929901_10155271800845556_8925135832021602426_n

Kelly Riker

Screen Shot 2015-01-24 at 2.48.19 PM

10676254_1544644235806232_2872442148904024764_n

  Amy Babinec

Screen Shot 2015-01-24 at 2.47.42 PM

10854307_10203444281443542_6230343674894946816_o

 

Shameless Promotin’

Posted on

For the last couple of weeks most artists, including both of us from Team CG, have been participating in the Art Exchange Game. Post 3 pieces everyday, for 5 days and nominate 3-5 (depending on the person who nominated you) other artists to do the same. The rules are muddy but the intent is clear: to give artists the space to promote themselves shamelessly, expand our networks and see what everyone’s up to. The byproduct of this experiment is an undeniable demonstration of talent to proves there’s not short supply here. Anyone with a platform for artwork should feel like a kid in a candy store right now.

Thank you to Kelly Riker for the nomination. Good luck to Amy Babinec, Anni Holm, Angela Bryant, Lauren Turk and Todd Reed. We’re looking forward to seeing what you have to offer.

Diana Gabriel

Screen Shot 2015-01-22 at 11.31.42 AM

Day 1. Piece 1. Ciclos @ Chicago Artists Coalition10392431_10155279383480556_8628069284309925468_n 10494725_10155279382580556_3236377378313013616_n 1278892_10155267089935556_4134771930266014063_o

Day 1. Piece 2. Projections @ Bridgeport Art Center

10915326_10155267098885556_6446273126954450342_n 1621746_10155279373150556_3995076631270098574_n

Day 1. Piece 3. Sonic

10920097_10155267088245556_7666760049163490813_o

Art at Morton College. Lauren Turk.

Posted on Updated on

Turk small Lauren Turk earned her BFA in Painting from Illinois State University and her MFA in Sculpture from Washington State University. She has exhibited work nationally and has had the great opportunity to collaborate on three pieces with ceramicist Beth Cavener Stichter. One of these projects was selected to be the centerpiece of 2012 Push Play Invitational at National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts in Bellevue, WA. Turk keeps an active studio practice and currently resides in Channahon, IL.

Lauren’s attracted to color and shape in objects that trigger memories in her or that might do so in other people. Her work is full of sparkly sweetness, but at a closer look, it can be rebellious. Her color and surface quality draw viewers in to the beautiful moments found in her work. This delicate facade is used as a vehicle to conceal topics the artist finds uncomfortable or taboo. The shapes in her work can be linked to the human body and the way we carry or conceal it. Some of the pieces droop, others are more phallic, but once together in an installation, these pieces work in harmony for a greater whole.

Lauren’s Work will be on display at Morton College from . Building C, first floor across from the book store.

Curated by Diana Gabriel.

Morton College. 3801 S Central Ave  Cicero, IL 60804

Cultivating an Art Scene at Pig and Weasel

Posted on Updated on

D and Na at Pig and Weasel
D and Na at Pig and Weasel

On the Mend Film Festival was a fusion between short, indie film and contemporary art at the Pig and Weasel in Evanston last weekend. The idea spawned from a conversation I had with P&W co-founder, Todd Rogers, at the rehearsal dinner for Dimitri Moore’s marriage to Naomi Hill. We were in the midst of the most expensive presidential campaign in history and shared the feeling that friendships, families and social constructs were coming apart at the seams. I told him about my film and he mentioned wanting to host a film festival at his venue. He and his wife, Monica Kass Rogers gave Diana and I free rein to curate a show around the theme of mending.

Familia Bom Brill screened with Black ink on Rice Paper by Thavary Krouch and (Super)Dan by Tim Tamisiea. All three films dealt with wounded protagonists that each healed in their own way. The artwork came from Diana’s friends that use content, medium or process to reflect on the past, tear down old constructs and resolve conflicts. Under one roof in Chicago’s north suburbs, patrons found contemporary work from Chicago, Bloomington, DeKalb and West Chicago with films that represent/portray Hollywood, New York, Las Vegas, Cambodia, Colombia and Nebraska. It was an eclectic show but, more importantly, it brought together networks and ideas that move toward a common goal.

Mario Contreras, Tim Tamisea (skyped,) Thavary Krouch and moderator, Joel McGinty
Mario Contreras, Tim Tamisea (skyped,) Thavary Krouch and moderator, Joel McGinty

Diana and I approached the curation differently but both with similar intentions. We both pulled from content that we’d watched develop over the years from artists that we stay connected to through personal connections… friends. One place where we differ is on whether to include our own work. As a filmmaker, I struggle to see film festival submission fees as anything more than a gamble at this point so if there’s a chance to put my film in front of an audience, I’ll take it. No shame in my game. Diana’s approach is more generous. If there’s empty wall space, she’d rather give her friends a chance to let their work speak for her. Either way, the important thing is to give a boost to artists around us because a rising tide lifts all ships.

Friends Curating Friends, a recent article in New City Art puts our little shindig in a box of incestuous blemishes that are a sign of “a gallery scene in eternal puberty.” Pedro Vélez implies that small, alternative spaces are a burden because too many of his friends have shows on the same night and it’s painful for him to drive around the city to see them all. I see alternative spaces like Pig and Weasel as bubbles of activity in a kettle that’s about to boil, pulling networks together in the vacuum left by the last, popped bubble. As co-owners Todd and Monica Rogers say, it’s where ideas pop and dreams fly.

I don’t really have a problem with being generous when returning favors. Neither with the reasoning behind building incestuous art communities—everyone does what they must to survive… But in a small gallery scene like Chicago’s, these types of navel-gazing endeavors simply clog exhibition venues and make things predictable and boring. – Pedro Vélez, New City Art

It’s coincidental that one of the shows referenced in Pedro’s article is Plant Life at Western Exhibitions because the curator, Geoffrey Todd Smith, is a friend of Diana’s and plant growth is the focus of her next show; Rooted, Grounded. The show was curated by Angela Bryant for Design Cloud Art Gallery and it also features work by Benjamin Gardener, another friend of Diana’s. Maybe instead of a boiling kettle or pimply teenager, we can describe the art scene in Chicago as organic or grassroots. To tie this to the idea of mending, In Defense of Weeds has a list of beneficial weeds that can alert you to nutrient shortages in your soil. Are we witnessing Art Permaculture?

Networking by Anni Holm
Networking by Anni Holm

Paul Germanos diagnoses the problem and possible solutions that alternative spaces, like weeds, try to alert us to in a scathing open letter to Vélez. His solutions sound similar to ones that we and others around us have tried as well…

“The Chicago Problem” in a word: audience. The competition for audience here is fierce. Our schools produce more artists, and our artists produce more artwork, than we have interested curators, gallerists, collectors, and critics to engage. So efforts are made, ever more frequently, to combine artwork with food, and drink, and music, in order to appeal to a broader audience. – Paul Germanos

Lauren Turk’s artist statement says that mending isn’t always about bringing things together. Sometimes mending means filling the gaps. Maybe instead of asking audiences to make the “pilgrimage” to Chicago to see the galleries, we need to meet audiences halfway by bringing art to their neighborhoods like Pig and Weasel, People Made Visible and Best Friends Gallery… all friends of ours, btw.